THE U.S.S GREATER SOUTH ASIA PROJECT: INTERESTS OF THE CENTRAL ASIAN COUNTRIES AND OF THE KEY NON-REGIONAL ACTORS

Atajan YAZMURADOV


Atajan Yazmuradov, Master of Arts in Political Science (Central Asia), Intern at the Geneva Center for Security Policy (Geneva, Switzerland)


Introduction

At the end of 2005, the U.S. changed its approach toward Central Asia as a region. Until very recently, in keeping with current practice, the White House administration looked at Central Asia as a separate region related to Russia and the CIS countries and consisting of five former Soviet republics: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. But in the new approach lobbied by the U.S. State Department and based on an essentially new regional conception, Central Asia is part of South Asia as a single super region we are calling Greater South Asia.

In our research, we will carry out an analysis of the Greater South Asia project from the viewpoint of the interests of the Central Asian countries. At the same time, we will study the influence of this project on the four other key players in Central Asia, whose interests will be affected by the implementation of this project: Pakistan, India, Russia, and China.

The Greater South Asia Project and the Interests of the Central Asian Countries

Implementation of the Greater South Asia project has both positive and negative consequences for the Central Asian countries. The positive aspects are


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