ENERGY SECURITY IN THE INTERRELATIONS AMONG THE EU, RF, UKRAINE, AND CENTRAL ASIA

Sergey TOLSTOV


Sergey Tolstov, Senior Fellow at the Institute of World Economy and International Relations, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (Kiev, Ukraine)


In the last few years, energy transit and long-term energy supply issues have come to the fore on the international scene. The reasons are obvious: Europe and North America are consuming increasingly larger amounts of energy, while the prospect of oil, natural gas and, in the more distant future, coal (non-renewable energy sources) shortages looms all the more ominously.

Everything related to international security (military security in particular) is highly structuralized within the system of international relations. However, Europes energy security, which is currently being discussed, has demonstrated a classic example of the inability of the state and corporate egotism to come to terms with each other in order to balance their highly varied interests.

Seen as a possibility, disrupted energy supply and the resultant energy deficit as a whole have already created different behavior patterns in the energy suppliers and consumers. In the European context, successful agreements in this sphere are limited to bilateral contracts among the EU structures, European energy distributors, and the energy supplier-companies, of which Russias Gazprom is the largest.

More often than not the very complicated and fairly contradictory positions of the sides involved in the multisided process obscure the real content of the European energy security issue and.


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