COLOR REVOLUTIONS AND PARLIAMENTARY DEMOCRACY IN GEORGIA AND KYRGYZSTAN

Aynura AKMATALIEVA


Aynura Akmatalieva, Ph.D. (Political Science), Senior Lecturer, Chair of Political Science, Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan)


ABSTRACT

The media of Kyrgyzstan described Georgia after the Rose Revolution of 2003 as a country that has made giant strides in economic recovery, suppressing corruption, and reform of its police and education system. The two countries increased their cooperation after the Tulip Revolution of 2010 in Kyrgyzstan; today, it has taken the form of an exchange of diplomatic and political experience and youth programs. Trade turnover between the two countries is expected to top $1.4 million.

These two Soviet successor-states, which adhere to different sociocultural and economic traditions, chose a practically identical road leading first to the presidential form of government and then to parliamentary democracies. This choice made after the color revolutions of 2003 in Georgia and 2005 and 2010 in Kyrgyzstan was suggested by the universal model of democracy that had gained popularity all over the world and was primarily a mechanism for legitimizing the power of the new people inside and outside the country. So far, parliamentary democracy in both countries has not developed enough to produce unambiguous results. It is much more important to understand how the changes were accepted and substantiated through an analysis of public discussions, discussions in the media and on the Internet, as well as in official documents, interviews, and statements by the leaders.

Keywords: Georgia, Kyrgyzstan, parliamentary democracy, color revolutions, Rose Revolution, Tulip Revolution, constitutional reforms, legitimation strategy.

Introduction

Georgia and the Kyrgyz Republic, which have very different sociocultural and economic traditions, opted for a practically identical road leading to the first post-Soviet parliamentary democracies. The two countries differ in population size and urbanization level. According to the 2010 figures, 53% of the Georgian population lived in cities; while the figure for Kyrgyzstan was.


Please fill subscription form to obtain full text of this jounal

SCImago Journal & Country Rank
UP - E-MAIL